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  • Lisa Palanca for Palanca Leadership

Chicken Soup: Parenting 101


My daughter called me last night.

While I love getting calls from her, from her home in Denver, I know that there are times I need to listen more than talk.

It was one of those listen days.

She works with kids.

Sometimes providing more stability for them than their own parents.

Last night, she was bone weary. She has become a “germ-a-phobe”.

It seems a mother, who works next door to the school (at a day care) was late in picking up her sick son. My daughter met her at the door and explained that the boy had told her how sick he had been all weekend. The mother laughed it off. Yeah, she said. He hasn’t felt well for a while.

There was a silent stand-off then.

My daughter explained her frustration to me. Who sends a child to school sick, picks him up late, and then says she knew he was sick when she brought him?

Being the director, she had gone to her computer from which she had just sent home a note about keeping sick kids home. She handed a copy to the mother and said that we really need to be diligent about these rules. Not only because of the Coronavirus, but because of the germs around when you get kids together. We have some nasty things going around.

The mom explained that she knew all about it, she worked in a day care, for heaven’s sake!

The frustration my daughter felt was palpable. I felt her simmering over the phone.

The irony being the woman worked just NEXT DOOR. All Day. Never checked in. Never stopped over.

And it got me to thinking about being up against it. No day care provider. Single mom, maybe. Needed money?

Oh. HECK. No.

There really are no excuses.

It walks a very fine line with child abuse.

I am not stirring up the virus panic, but I am banging the drum for all teachers out there who see this happen, try to get a hold of parents who don’t answer the phone and whose emergency contact has been disconnected.

Surely we are better than this. Surely that company you work for will understand the importance of your child not infecting others.

It doesn’t take a village here. It takes responsibility of people who are the primary caretakers of their children.

Please, please understand that communicable diseases are spread by your child just being there when there are infected children present.

Hopefully, with Spring Break around the corner, we can avoid situations where being cooped up with other people’s germs can ease up a bit.

Thanks for listening.


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